Chorus
2017-2018 auditions

District 2 auditions are October 19 in Auburn (Edward Little High School). We take a school bus there.
Tell me by October 1st! The cost is $6. The festival (if you make it) is in late January.
You will need to do the following three things:
1. sing a scale (do re mi fa sol la ti do)
2. sing "Per la Gloria" - Get the music from Mrs. Sawtelle
3. do a little sight-singing


This is the website that will help you learn to sight-sing and also get helpful information about other parts of the audition http://maineallstatechorusauditions.com/

All-State auditions are November 17 in Biddeford. I will drive you there.
Tell me by October 10th! The cost is $22. The festival (if you make it) is in mid-May.
You will need to do all the same things as the district audition, PLUS
4. sing your part in "Fire Fire My Heart."
Click here to get the PDF for "Fire Fire" and to find mp3 recordings for practicing.

Per la Gloria tenor
Per la Gloria soprano
Per la Gloria alto
Per la Gloria bass

rubric

This is what the judges are looking for:

Adjudicator Guidelines

10 Point Scale
     Below Average = 0 – 3          Average = 3.5 – 6.5       Above Average = 7 – 10
5 Point Scale
       Below Average = 0 – 1.5       Average = 2 – 3             Above Average = 3.5 – 5

Posture / Support: The average high school singer displays an understanding of well-balanced posture and abdominal/costal breathing, although execution is inconsistent and may degrade over the course of a performance. The below average singer displays little understanding of either, usually resulting in a casual or rigid stance and noticeable chest and shoulder movement. The above average singer displays a consistent application of well-balanced posture and breathing technique throughout the entire performance. Judges are encouraged to specify casual or rigid posture.

Intonation:  The average high school singer displays an understanding of center of pitch and relative natural tuning, although execution is inconsistent across the range and vowel spectrum. The below average singer displays little understanding of either, usually resulting in a consistently flat, sharp, or inconsistent intonation. The above average singer displays a consistent execution of both, resulting in an intonation that sits on top of the center of the pitch across range and vowels. Judges are encouraged to specify flat, sharp, or inconsistent tuning.

Tone / Placement: The average high school singer displays an understanding of free and open tone and tall and centered placement, although execution is inconsistent across the range and vowel spectrum. The below average singer displays little understanding of either, usually resulting in a tight sound and/or collapsed placement. The above average singer displays a consistent execution of both, resulting in a full, free, and open tone across range and vowels.

Diction: The average high school singer displays an understanding of proper vowel shaping and consonant articulation, although execution is inconsistent, some vowel choices may seem arbitrary, and some consonants may be overdone. The below average singer displays little understanding of either, usually resulting in all vowels having a neutral sound and most consonants being lost. The above average singer displays a consistent execution of both, resulting in consistent, pleasant vowel choices and consonants that are present without being obtrusive.

Dynamics / Phrasing: The average high school singer displays an understanding of stylistic artistry, although execution is inconsistent and some artistic choices may seem mechanical and arbitrary. The below average singer displays little understanding, usually resulting in a performance devoid of any artistry at all. The above average singer displays a consistent application of appropriate artistic choices for the style, resulting in a natural, believable performance.

Notes / Rhythms: The average high school singer is well prepared, although a missed note or shortchanged rhythm due to nerves is not unexpected. The below average singer is not well prepared, and may become lost, miss entrances, or improvise rhythms. The above average singer is well prepared, note and rhythm perfect, and independent of the sheet music.

Part Independence: The average high school singer can hold their part, although balance, blend, and tuning to the chord may be inconsistent. The below average singer has trouble holding their part and may become lost or begin singing another part in unison or octaves. The above average singer appears completely comfortable singing their part and focuses more on being part of the ensemble than on their own line.

Scale: The average high school singer displays a familiarity with the major scale, although relative tuning may be inconsistent. The below average singer displays little familiarity, usually resulting in losing the tonality completely. The above average singer displays a strong familiarity resulting in accurate relative tuning both up and down the scale.

Overall Presentation: The average high school singer displays an understanding of the audition process, although some anxiety may be evident. The below average singer displays little understanding of the audition process and heightened anxiety, usually requiring extra guidance from the judges and often making excuses for the performance. The above average singer displays a comfort level with the audition process, completing it with confidence and a pleasant demeanor.

Sight Singing:

Rhythm: The average high school singer can perform the rhythmic pattern accurately in isolation, but may not keep a consistent beat when adding melody. The below average singer will improvise the rhythms. The above average singer will perform the rhythms accurately while simultaneously performing the melody.

Melody: The average high school singer can perform the melodic pattern accurately in isolation, but may lose tonality when adding rhythm. The below average singer will improvise the melody. The above average singer will perform the melody accurately while simultaneously performing the rhythms.



Shenandoah
is a mash-up of two arrangements
The first part of this one (up to about 1:30)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZwC43h7WRgg
and the second part of this one (start at 1:50)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tHjou2SCZhc

City Called Heaven
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PReGmq2H4uw

Play a Simple Melody
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DM7rNNzO7uw

Somebody That I Used to Know
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hOKuAigsrec

3 Spirituals
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3FCxz683FKc
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bFtWnUf1iWc
http://thebirdsings.com/OLD/songs/wade.html


Sight-singing one note at a time (very helpful ) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UNaa6ZI1zu4

Rhythm exercises for reading music
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N5Yx0U0SCZ8
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QsV6cMqklJY

Practice tracks for "What a Wonderful World"
http://www.singwithus.net/sounds/WonderfulWorld%20-%20soprano.mp3

http://www.singwithus.net/sounds/WonderfulWorld%20-%20alto.mp3

http://www.singwithus.net/sounds/WonderfulWorld%20-%20men.mp3

http://www.singwithus.net/sounds/WonderfulWorld%20-%20mixed.mp3


Alto only for "Turn the World Around" http://www.owassops.org/webpages/mharrison/files/12alto2-turntheworldaround.mp3

Sight-singing absolute basics https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FYVMhYLzGr4
More advanced sight-singing links http://maineallstatechorusauditions.com/choral-requirements/sight-singing/sight-singing-practice-examples/
And even more sight-singing materials http://www.thepracticeroom.net/exercises-main.php

What a Wonderful World
http://www.jwpepper.com/1675586.item#.WIjB6CSze-0
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iTHrHDlvVPA


Turn the World Around
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CB9pwFJbJB8
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d9fLcVae01A
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kSBYfgZmTV4

COFFEE (round)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fwE-1o-35M4
COFFEE round
turn world 1

turn world 2

turn world 3